Speed Of Light Research Paper

Speed Of Light Research Paper-48
(One of the first measurements of the speed of light was derived from observed changes in the timing of the eclipses of Jupiter's moons by Olaus Roemer in 1676.) We could, for example, take the definitions of the units as they stood between 19.Then, the metre was defined as 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of the reddish-orange light from a krypton-86 source, and the second was defined (then as now) as 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of caesium-133.

(One of the first measurements of the speed of light was derived from observed changes in the timing of the eclipses of Jupiter's moons by Olaus Roemer in 1676.) We could, for example, take the definitions of the units as they stood between 19.Then, the metre was defined as 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of the reddish-orange light from a krypton-86 source, and the second was defined (then as now) as 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of caesium-133.

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The quantum theory of atoms tells us that these frequencies and wavelengths depend chiefly on the values of Planck's constant, the electronic charge, and the masses of the electron and nucleons, as well as on the speed of light.

By eliminating the dimensions of units from the parameters we can derive a few dimensionless quantities, such as the fine-structure constant and the electron-to-proton mass ratio.

In that case, it would make more sense to attribute the changes to variations in the charge on the electron or the particle masses than to changes in the speed of light.

In any case, there is good observational evidence to indicate that those parameters have not changed over most of the lifetime of the universe.

All of chemistry depends on their values, and significant changes would alter the chemical and mechanical properties of all substances.

Furthermore, the speed of light itself would change by different amounts according to which definition of units was used.Unfortunately it doesn't mention anything about inertial frames, but you can consider a measurement in an inertial frame to be implied. At the moment you can measure macroscopic distances most accurately by sending out laser light pulses and timing how long they take to travel using a very accurate atomic clock.(The best atomic clocks are accurate to about one part in 10.) It therefore makes sense to define the metre unit in such a way as to minimise errors in such a measurement.The SI definition also assumes that measurements taken in different inertial frames will give the same results for light's speed.This is actually a postulate of special relativity, discussed below.Previously the metre and second have been defined in various different ways according to the measurement techniques of the time. If we look back to 1939, the second was defined as 1/86,400 of a mean solar day, and the metre as the distance between two scratches on a bar of platinum-iridium alloy held in France.We now know that there are variations in the length of a mean solar day as measured by atomic clocks.See the FAQ article Have physical constants changed with time?(Note that the fine-structure constant does change with energy scale, but I am referring to the constancy of its low-energy limit.) Another assumption on the laws of physics made by the SI definition of the metre is that the theory of relativity is correct.The ratio by which it is slowed is called the refractive index of the medium and is This was discovered by Jean Foucault in 1850.When people talk about "the speed of light" in a general context, they usually mean the speed of light in a vacuum.

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